Our Fabric Story

As we grow as a brand and business, we are constantly searching for beautiful, high-quality fabrics that help create durable, sustainable garments that you will wear ever year and every season. We are very excited for the fabrics used in our Edition 4 collection and want to share their story with you.

 

Tencel

Tencel is a natural, man made fibre which is also referred to as Lyocell.

Made with wood pulp from sustainable tree farms, tencel textiles are created through the use of nanotechnology in an award-winning closed-loop process that recovers or decomposes all solvents and emissions.

Though it’s certified by the international Forest Stewardship Council and 100% biodegradable, perhaps the greatest benefits are the variety and exceptional comfort you can experience with tencel clothing.

  • Eco Print
    Made from the natural cellulose found in wood pulp. The fiber is economical in its use of energy and natural resources, and is fully biodegradable.
  • Colour Rich
    Tencel was created with color in mind, because of the fibers’ high absorbency. 
  • Moisture Absorbent
    This eco fabric has natural breathability and 50% greater moisture absorption than cotton.
  • Anti-bacterial
    Due to its moisture management, Tencel is also anti-bacterial.
  • Feel of Fabric
    Similar to rayon in feel. Soft, breathable, lightweight and comfortable. Tencel has an extremely smooth, soft surface that drapes beautifully to flatter every figure.
  • Great for sensitive skin
    Tencel’s smooth fibre surface feels soft and supple against the skin and its incredible wicking abilities keep the skin dry, making Tencel a great fabric for sensitive skin.
  • Durable
    This super fibre can hold up to a beating when both we and dry, and is most conveniently resistant to wrinkles.
Tana Lawn Cotton from Liberty London
This is a cotton that behaves like silk ultra-fine, with a fluid hand-feel and intense depth of color that is truly unmatchable. Tana Lawn cotton is soft yet durable, cooling yet warming, and even machine washable.
Whist travelling the plains of East Africa in the 1920s, Liberty buyer William Hayes Dorell discovered curious cotton fibers close to Lake Tana that sparked his imagination. Back on home soil, the silk-like threads were spun into lustrous form, screen printed with brilliant ink, and turned into a material that would change the textile industry forevermore. This was called Tana Lawn.